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Hi folks, this is my first question for the group, so go easy on me :). After hearing about the "Occupy/Protest" class that Columbia University was recently considering (it's been shot down, thank goodness), I realized that my family has a big issue ahead in less than two years, when our eldest enters college. We've raised the kids to be very free-thinking, and it would be a disaster if they ended up at a highly-rated school that doesn't really promote rationality. Is there anything like a "list" of colleges that either don't have a bias against Objectivism or are open to it? I know about John Ellison's affiliation with UNC, and Tara Smith's affiliation with UT Austin, but that's about it. I'm sure that many of you with families have gone down this road already. Any insights or info. to share?

asked Jan 09 '12 at 20:40

Rational%20Mom's gravatar image

Rational Mom
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edited Jan 05 '14 at 14:15

Greg%20Perkins's gravatar image

Greg Perkins ♦♦
1002425618

I have no idea how good the school is, but Clemson University has an Institute for the study of Capitalism in which many free market and moral advocates of Capitalism--including Rand, I believe--are studied. It even seems Objectivist Scholar Andrew Bernstein has worked there. Good luck!

http://www.clemson.edu/capitalism/

(Jan 07 '14 at 13:51) Juan Diego dAnconia Juan%20Diego%20dAnconia's gravatar image

My answer is influenced very heavily by my personal experience. Since it turned out pretty well, in my opinion, I'll share it. For undergrad I went to a school in the midwest known for its engineering (which was my major). It was in the bible belt, so the general student population and culture was not friendly to reason or Objectivism. But there was a student Objectivist club, and that became my introduction and unofficial (but incredibly thorough and rewarding) program during my undergrad years. So two things I recommend you look for in a college: a strong technical school (engineering or science) and an active Objectivist student club. Having a strong technical school means you should have a decent population of students and professors who value logic, reason, and respect for an objective, knowable reality. Even if your kids aren't majoring in a technical field, that's important.

answered Jan 15 '12 at 15:53

QEDbyBrett's gravatar image

QEDbyBrett ♦
189312

Thanks for the ideas! If you found a safe harbor in the Bible Belt, then I'm sure we can help our kids do the same. I would still love it if there was a list...guess I'll work on this as we go on our college visits next year!

(Jan 15 '12 at 22:29) Rational Mom Rational%20Mom's gravatar image

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Asked: Jan 09 '12 at 20:40

Seen: 2,452 times

Last updated: Jan 07 '14 at 13:53